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Downtown Johnson City members get construction updates

By Megan Gorey
Published On: Mar 01 2013 04:51:25 PM CST
Updated On: Mar 01 2013 06:22:56 PM CST

A public forum was held Friday to update downtown business owners and residents about the projects.

JOHNSON CITY, Tenn. -

There is a lot of construction going on around downtown Johnson City.

"There is going to be a lot of activity that will occur in downtown in the next couple months," said public works director Phil Pindzola.

A public forum was held Friday to update downtown business owners and residents about the projects.

The design for the new Farmer's Market should be ready in six to eight weeks. It will include an open shed that will house about 60 stalls and the plan will also add more parking.

Pindzola said it will be used about two to three times a week and then possibly more in the future depending on popularity and events. "The goal is to get more people downtown," Pindzola said. "We don't' know for sure how big the Farmer's Market needs to be."

Across the street, the Founder's Park is scheduled to be complete in September including a new creek, waterfalls, lawn and theater. As part of that project, Lamont Street will be redone, along with more parking.

The Lady of the Fountain Plaza will be dug up. Pindzola said they are looking for public input on the project including a new theme. He wants to expand the green space.

As far as downtown 'streetscape,' permeable pavers and an island are being installed on Buffalo Street. As part of the city's plan to prevent flooding, crews will be installing drain pipes starting on Monday. Parts of the street will be closed for about two weeks.

Speaking of flooding, buildings have been torn down on the Boone Street lot so work can begin on the retention pond. Crews are still working on a design, which could include a winter ice skating rink.

The Washington County Economic Development Council estimates the projects will cost more than $5 million to complete.