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Growth, strategy means King University students won’t see tuition increase

By Meredith Machen, mmachen@wcyb.com
Published On: Feb 20 2013 04:19:53 PM CST
Updated On: Jan 30 2013 11:00:00 PM CST

First a new name, and now a new promise as King University offers students some financial relief.

BRISTOL, Tenn. -

First a new name and now a new promise; growth at King University, formerly King College, will be giving students some financial relief.

We've learned King will not be raising tuition fees for the next school year.

News 5 found out why for the first time in years the school is bucking the expensive tradition.

Some said a college education is invaluable, but it rarely ever comes cheap; especially at privately funded schools like King University.

"Seeing that the school was $34,000 was kind of a sticker shock at first," said student Zach Irby.

Junior Alysha Atkins works three on-campus jobs to help offset costs that seem to multiply each year.

"My loans for school have [gone] up every year because of tuition," Atkins said.

But this coming year, students are catching a break.

We discovered an internal study recommended by placing funds in a certain way extra money from students wasn't needed.     

Much of it, we're told, is because King's donors are stepping up and the college is growing fast.

"We are growing and expanding so much through our online offering and our graduate and professional studies offerings, and so the tuition revenue that comes from that [helps]," said Hughes.

Hughes told us traditionally, tuition fees have increased between three and four percent a year, now up to $23,000 for a traditional undergraduate.

"Close to the increase in the tradition cost of living across the board," said Hughes.

Based on that trend, we did a little math. A student paying $23,000 in tuition with a 3.5 percent increase is $805 students won’t pay.

It's extra money in student's pockets to use now or later when it's time to pay back the debt they hope will be well worth it in the years to come.

"It helps knowing that I'm not going to be paying for more than I thought for my degree," said Atkins. 

King University officials told us stabilizing tuition could be a way to help recruit new students to campus.

We're told most students receive scholarships.