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Gun shows and the process of making a purchase

Published On: Feb 10 2013 07:49:59 PM CST
Updated On: Feb 11 2013 09:01:55 AM CST
GRAY, Tenn. -

Buying a gun doesn't come easily, especially if you are a convicted felon at a gunshow.
That's a fact we learned Sunday at the Appalachian Fairgrounds in Gray.
"Every time you go through a dealer you have to do a background check," says shopper Jesse Burke.
"Some people are approved right away, some people are delayed, some people are denied. I've seen it where people have been denied and law enforcement will come to a show and make arrests if they have warrants on their record," says Laura Meade, employee of 'Shoot Two Thrill'.


News 5 wanted to see just what process was taken, in order for someone to buy a gun.
"21 to have a handgun, 18 for a long gun," Gun Show Manager, Billy Abner tells us.
But, age isn't the only factor. Background checks are also required. The owner of 'Monte's Gun Emporium', Monte Arbanas who walked us through how they do it.
"An average seven minutes for a return," he says.
The first process of doing a background check is providing your driver's license then filling out a form.
"It's required by ATF to fill this out then we use the computer system, then we do a background check to make sure you're not a convicted felon, or shouldn't have a firearm. It also includes mental health issues. The state of Tennessee does that," says Arbanas.
We're told there are no requirements to have a handgun permit, expect for conceal and carrying, but J.C. Harrison with '2nd Amendemnt Enforcer' says, it's a good idea to take a class.
"They're more aware of what's going on, we teach them safety, so if the right person's trained, they're going to take precautions versus someone who's not trained. They're just going to go out and do things they shouln't be doing. Purposefully or accidentally," says Harrison.

Something dealers here say, they are very cautious of.
"No one wants guns to go into the wrong hangs. Everyone in this room wants to make sure everyone's getting it the right way. Law abiding citizens. No one wants to see it happen like it did in Connecticut," says Meade.


Each dealer does a background check, and it goes through TBI, the ATF and the FBI, before it's approved.