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Kingsport City Schools bring in Wi-Fi connection for students

By Megan Brantley, mbrantley@wcyb.com
Published On: Jan 02 2013 05:26:48 PM CST
Updated On: Jan 02 2013 01:30:54 PM CST

Kingsport City Schools are putting technology first in their schools by giving their students a Wi-Fi connection and allowing them to bring their smart phones to access it.

KINGSPORT, Tenn. -

Kingsport City Schools are putting technology first in their schools by giving their students a Wi-Fi connection and allowing them to bring their smart phones to access it.

"When you look at how devices are brought into schools, policies and procedures have been to prevent them or limit them,” said Andy True, Kingsport City Schools Administrative Coordinator.

We found out these tech gadgets could be the key to a better learning environment. "What research is showing is if a student has a device in their hand one on one with it then their test scores improve, their motivations improve," said John Payne, Director of Technology for Kingsport City Schools.

"By allowing them to utilize those technologies that they're so familiar with, really opens the door to a wide range of possibilities to begin with," said True.

That is why the Kingsport City school system is going interactive; they're letting their students bring in smartphones, iPads and laptops. "Things are changing so fast, new resources are available so quickly," said True.

The Wi-Fi accessibility will allow the students to get on the internet to download certain apps to improve their education in a way that a textbook cannot.

We learned that as soon as these books come off the printing press they are already outdated. The school system is hoping that by allowing the students to bring in their technology devices, it will help students obtain accurate and reliable information.

True tells News 5 these outdated books stay in the school system for up to six years. "We've talked here [about] what would our landscape be like if we didn't buy anymore printed text books, if we provided electronic resources for children that are updated continually," said True.

School officials are hoping to have all of their wireless connections up by the end of February and say the school will have blocks on their connections so students will only be able to access certain material.