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Labor of love: Dry Creek flood victim gets new home

By Meredith Machen, mmachen@wcyb.com
Published On: Nov 20 2012 04:45:42 PM CST
Updated On: Nov 20 2012 12:30:01 PM CST

Just three-and-a-half months ago, flood waters devastated the Dry Creek community in Washington County, Tennessee. Now a labor of love is helping build that community back with a special milestone on Tuesday.

WASHINGTON COUNTY, Tenn. -

Just three-and-a-half months ago, flood waters devastated the Dry Creek community in Washington County, Tennessee. Now a labor of love is helping build that community back with a special milestone on Tuesday.

He's known as the man who rode his house down Dry Creek Road in rushing water. Just over three months later Doug Wilson has a new set of keys to a brand new home.

We were there as he saw it for the very first time on Tuesday. A sturdy foundation, newly framed walls, and little pieces of home were all put together by the help of volunteers in just under one month.

"It's just [awfully] nice and beautiful, and it's just hard to explain being in a beautiful home like this," said Doug Wilson.

Wilson's home is just the first of many the Appalachia Service Project is hoping to complete in Washington County. We learned six other homes are already under roof, including one right next door.

While the rebuilding effort is making great strides here in Dry Creek Road, the flood's devastation is still very easy to find, showing there's still a long way to go on the road to recovery. "We probably have anywhere from 18 to 20 more to build just depending on how things work out," said Walter Crouch, ASP president.

For Anna Baldwin, whose home was swept away by the flood, a new house of her own is something she can hardly wait for. "I'll probably cry. I did when I was told I was getting a house, so I'll probably cry," Baldwin told News 5.

That's because just like in Wilson's case, a new home is a fresh start. It's one that means just a little bit more as its time to give thanks three months after witnessing unthinkable damage.

"We've got a lot to be thankful for," Wilson said. "Give the glory to God for doing it for us."

We're told one other home is expected to open its doors before Thanksgiving. The other six should be finished by Christmas, and the Appalachia Service Project hopes to be finished rebuilding homes in Dry Creek by the end of next summer.