Blountville
68° F
Scattered Clouds
Scattered Clouds
Greeneville
68° F
Scattered Clouds
Scattered Clouds
Abingdon
69° F
Clear
Clear
Advertisement

Rhythm & Roots gets a 'rain check'

By Jonathan Radford, jradford@wcyb.com
Published On: Dec 24 2013 07:19:34 AM CST
Updated On: Sep 23 2013 01:26:39 PM CDT

The streets are open, the music has stopped, and the sun is shinning, but that wasn't the case Saturday during the first full day of Bristol's Rhythm & Roots Reunion.

BRISTOL, Tenn. -

The streets are open, the music has stopped, and the sun is shinning, but that wasn't the case Saturday during the first full day of Bristol's Rhythm & Roots Reunion.

"Friday was wonderful and we knew it was coming, then Saturday was a little bit of a washout earlier in the day," said Charlene Baker, Marketing Director for the festival.

Baker tells News 5 that in years past severe weather caused some costly problems. "It might have been 2006, [there were] pretty heavy winds connecting severe weather and we had to shut down the State Street stage," she said.

She also told News 5 that they didn't have rain insurance and that taught them a lesson. According to Baker, for the past four years they have paid for rain insurance to insure that they can pay the cost of the performers and venues if the weather doesn't cooperate.

A certified weather observer stood at the old railroad station from noon until 5 p.m. on Saturday and it rained the entire time.

According to the observer, it rained .60 inches during that five-hour period, enough to reach the insurance quota of a quarter inch to receive a cash payout. It is believed that the organization will receive somewhere in the neighborhood of $50,000 in rain insurance. They tell News 5 it will be put in their 'rainy day' fund.

News 5 Chief Meteorologist Dave Dierks said the kind of downpour downtown experienced Saturday is usual for September. "September on average is our second-driest month of the year, so to have an all in one day like we had is somewhat uncommon," said Dierks.

Baker told us that's why they have the outdoor music festival in September, and she realizes they have no control of the weather, no matter the time or the place.

"It's hit or miss. We live in the South, you know how the weather is down here, it can change on a dime," said Baker.