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Congressmen host Q & A session for community

By Laura Halm
Published On: May 01 2013 09:26:56 PM CDT
Updated On: May 01 2013 03:33:43 PM CDT
TOWN HALL MEETING
BRISTOL, Tenn. -

A town hall style meeting Wednesday night crossed the state line. Virginia Congressman Morgan Griffith and Tennessee Congressman Phil Roe met with voters in Bristol. This wasn't a first for the Republican pair as they held a similar town hall style meeting about two years ago.

Both congressmen say it gives them a one-on-one opportunity to find out what's on the mind of their voters. Two states and two Republican congressmen, sitting face-to-face in Bristol with those they represent in Washington D.C. "The state line is important, but also we're one community when it comes to a lot of the issues that we're facing related to coal, to jobs, to Obama-care," said Congressman Morgan Griffith.

The concerns voters brought to the table ranged from the federal budget, to jobs. But the night's hot topic was healthcare. "They [Federal Government] said they were going to cut medicare and social security and senior citizens are on fixed incomes, so we need to figure that out," said resident Judy Tindell.

Others asked about a groundbreaking decision from the Pentagon allowing women to serve their country from the front lines. "I asked if they [Congressman Roe and Congressman Griffith] could impact that from a congressional standpoint and the answer was no, they didn't think they could," added resident Bob Greeson.

It was also a chance for the community to hear two different perspectives and learn more on discussions in Capitol Hill. "I'm here to represent them and when I find out what's on their mind I can go back and look at that piece of legislation and say 'Yes the people of my district, they're behind that and they'll support that.'" said Congressman Phil Roe.

Even though some in the audience were too young to vote, they still wanted the opportunity to ask questions. "Well I'm very concerned about our country's future and I just want to see what our local politicians are going to do about it," said 15-year-old Alex Adams.

If you missed Wednesday's town hall meeting, both congressmen say folks are more than welcome to send an email. You can include a list of questions, or attend another meeting like this one.