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Voters discuss their reasons for casting ballots

By Jim Conrad, jconrad@wcyb.com
Published On: May 06 2014 04:38:03 PM CDT
Updated On: May 06 2014 07:18:10 PM CDT

Why vote in the primary elections, a small municipal race, or in a general election?  Maybe it's civic pride, involvement in your community, a sense of service, or maybe there's someone you'd like to see in office. There are as many reasons as voters on Election Day.

BRISTOL, Va. -

Why vote in the primary elections, a small municipal race, or in a general election?  Maybe it's civic pride, involvement in your community, a sense of service, or maybe there's someone you'd like to see in office. There are as many reasons as voters on Election Day.

Slow but steady was the reaction to the amount of voters casting their ballots on May 6. It might be a municipal election for city council, or maybe a party primary that includes county office holders.

Exercising the right to vote varies among voters at the poll. Most of the voters that we talked to have made a habit of voting since that very first time. "[I've been voting] since I graduated from college in 1956," voter Marilyn Williams said.

For some, just having the right to vote is something that sets America apart and makes the democratic system work.

"Polls are open long enough that everybody has an opportunity to vote," Williams told us. In reality, not all do; in Sullivan County, after all is said and done, only 14 to 15 percent of registered voters will do so.

"It's a civic duty to vote. Everyone should vote, and if you don't vote don't complain," Marilyn Williams bluntly told us.

On the other side of the spectrum are young people. 20-year-old Cameron Sale has been involved even before he was old enough to vote. "I've been out here ever since I turned 18. I campaigned before I was 18. It's not so much supporting one candidate or the other as it is just getting out here and being around the election polls," Cameron said.

For Cameron, its all about being involved in the community. "It's more than just getting involved, just getting down here and seeing people come in. It's not so much the politics as it is the the community, being involved," he said.

Civic duty, and being involved -- plus it's a right, so take advantage of it.

Be sure to join us tonight for News 5 at 11 with all your election results. You can also like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter for real-time details on races.